Which Chess Opening Move is Best? Part 2

In Part 1, we discussed 1.e4. I opined that the King Pawn universe is not for everyone. That begs the question: What About the Closed Openings? This is a much broader topic, because it includes basically everything except 1.e4! Still, there’s an obvious place to start. 1.d4 — Have it Your Way Generally, you’ll prefer

How to Get Better at Chess: Chess Masters on Their Art

Wide-Ranging Opinions by Chess Pros How to Get Better At Chess contains answers from Grandmasters and International Masters about their thoughts on chess improvement, motivation, study methods, etc. I can’t remember how I discovered this book, but I’m glad I did. It was hard to put this book down, and I read it all in a

Chess Openings Discussion

A Lively Chess Openings Debate Chess Openings are always a contentious topic! My recent post “The Smith-Morra Gambit, and How to Beat It,” generated spirited discussion on Facebook, as I expected it might. I don’t consider the Smith-Morra (1.e4 c5 2.d4) completely unsound or without merit, but a Sicilian player should embrace the Morra, Alapin,

Beating the Smith-Morra Gambit

The Smith-Morra: A Controversial Anti-Sicilian Faced with the Sicilian Defense (1.e4 c5), many white players avoid the Open Sicilian that comes about after 2.Nf3 and 3.d4. Instead, they choose an Anti-Sicilian like the Smith-Morra Gambit (1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3) At club level, an unprepared black player can quickly find themselves in serious danger. White

Don’t Worship Your Chess Engine!

Chess engines can be a valuable tool… Chess computer software is extremely popular, and has been for a long time. A chess engine can analyze your games and give you an idea of how well or poorly you played. With ratings topping the 3400 mark, these monsters are several hundred points stronger than any human

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