Reader Question: Which Sicilian?

A few weeks ago I received this question from a reader; sorry for the late post and reply!

Hi Andre,
My name is Marc and I love your website! I am trying to find my Sicilian! I like your article. I don’t want to play Sveshnikov or Dragon or Najdorf as it’s too much theory. Though I do like sharp positions.
I was thinking of playing the Richter-Rauzer and vs most other moves [like] f3, Bc4, and Bg5 play a Dragon (or if Be3, play …Ng4) or play Schevenigen with …e6 move order and deal with Keres attack.
I think Taimanov though also combative is under hard times somewhat due to Be3 and Qf3.  Or do you have another idea?
Thanks,
Marc Sicina

Hi Marc,
Thanks for the kind words and the question!
My first thought is that if you want to play a sharp Sicilian, don’t run from theory.
I don’t think the Classical (against which the main line is the Richter-Rauzer, as Marc points out: 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 and now 6.Bg5) is right for a sharp player. It’s more of a positional system.
I’m not an expert on the Scheveningen, but allowing the Keres Attack seems very risky and gives your opponent the sharp position, not you!
The Sveshnikov is theory-heavy, but not super-sharp, but of course a great choice.
I’m going to give you the answer you probably already know but won’t like: I think if you want a sharp (and sound) Sicilian, you have to choose the Najdorf or Taimanov, if you want to avoid Dragon theory. Remember that you whatever theory you don’t know, generally your opponents will know even less!