Sicilian Attacks: Powerful Charges & Typical Tactics

Sicilian Attacks: Powerful Charges & Typical Tactics GM Yuri Yakovich New in Chess, 2010 Paperback, $21.82 (new) on Amazon This is the third book by Yakovich, after The Complete Sveshnikov Sicilian (Gambit, 2002), and Play the 4.f3 Nimzo-Indian (Gambit, 2005). Those books were well-reviewed, and this effort makes the author 3 for 3. Note: I

Chess Tactics: Tatai — Kortschnoj, 1978

Viktor Kortschnoj (1931-2016) was born in Leningrad, USSR (now Saint Petersburg, Russia). A four-time Soviet Champion and two-time World Championship Challenger (1978, 1981), Kortschnoj is universally considered one of the greatest chess players never to become World Champion. Other players in this category could include Akiba Rubinstein, Reuben Fine, Paul Keres, David Bronstein, and Vassily

Chess Tactics: Mecking — Tan, 1973

Henrique Mecking (born 1952) was the first Brazilian to become a Grandmaster (1972) and won back-to-back Interzonals at Petropolis 1973 and Manila 1976. He was ranked as high as World #3 in January 1978, behind only World Champion Anatoly Karpov and Challenger Viktor Kortschnoj! Unfortunately, he contracted a serious illness in the late 1970s, and

Understanding the Caro-Kann Defense

The Best Book to Learn the Caro-Kann Defense Understanding the Caro-Kann Defense was published way back in 1981. Amazon tells me I purchased it in March 2012, but I’ve only read it recently … and regret not doing so much sooner. I have read a lot of Caro-Kann (1.e4 c6) books over the years, as I

Positional Chess Handbook: Strategy for All Levels

495 Chess Lessons in Your Pocket Positional Chess Handbook can be considered a strategy cousin to 1001 Chess Sacrifices and Combinations, the iconic puzzle book by Fred Reinfeld. Both are pocket-sized and ideal for studying on-the-go — but PCH is definitely the superior book. I recommend Positional Chess Handbook to players (and coaches!) of all

Winning Slowly at Chess

Frustrate Your Opponent Some readers may groan upon seeing the title of this post, and that’s okay. I get it. Who, when taking their first steps in chess, dreams of winning wars of attrition? Probably no one. On the contrary, I often fantasized about winning a brilliant game in a tournament hall or chess club

Chess Tactics: Spassky — Rashkovsky, 1973

Boris Spassky (born 1937) was the tenth World Chess Champion (1969-1972). Before that, however, he was one of the greatest prodigies of early modern professional chess. Born in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg), Spassky defeated Mikhail Botvinnik in a simul as a ten-year-old in 1947, a year before Botvinnik became World Champion. With a third-place finish

Chess Tactics: Harding — NN, 2020

Isolated Queen Pawn Adventures Today I want to show one of my recent blitz games on the Internet Chess Club (ICC). I think it is somewhat instructive, especially in the context of IQP (Isolated Queen Pawn) positions. I have enjoyed playing the white side of IQP positions ever since I read Alexander Baburin‘s phenomenal Winning

Chess Tactics: Gashimov — Gelfand, 2009

Vugar Gashimov (1986-2014) was a top player from Azerbaijan who was dogged with ill health for much of his life. Despite this, he rose as high as World Number 6 in November 2009. Gashimov reached a peak rating of 2761 in January 2012, the same month as Wijk aan Zee. As it turned out, this

The English Opening: Playing 1.c4

The English Opening or … I am by no means a specialist on openings in general, or the English Opening in particular, but I have opened with 1.c4, 1.d4, 1.e4, and 1.Nf3 in my tournament career. As many before me have said, 1.e4 is the most straightforward first move, and 1.d4 can be very direct

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