Category Archives: Games

Interesting and instructive chess games from the past and present.

Chess Tactics: Van Wely — Ki. Georgiev, 1997

Loek Van Wely. Photo: FIDE

Loek Van Wely. Photo: FIDE

Loek Van Wely (b. 1972) is one of the greatest Dutch players ever, becoming Champion of the Netherlands eight times so far.

A notable tournament victory was the 1996 New York Open. He is also a fixture at the prestigious Wijk aan Zee super tournaments.

In October 2001 Van Wely achieved a career-high rating of 2714 while climbing to 10th in the world rankings, also a career high.

 

Van Wely wins a sparkling game against Kiril Georgiev, another former top player (=9th in the world, January 1993), and author. This game was played in the first FIDE Knockout World Championship in 1997. This tournament has since become the World Cup.

White to play. How did Van Wely punch his ticket to the Quarterfinals of the grueling knockout?

18. ?

Line Clear

Chess Tactics: Von Scheve — Teichmann, 1907

Richard Teichmann. Photo: Deutscher Schachbund.

Richard Teichmann lost sight in his right eye in the 1890s. Photo: Deutscher Schachbund.

Richard Teichmann (1868-1925) was one of the best players of the early 20th century.

The German master was nicknamed “Richard V,” as that was often his tournament placing.

Karlsbad 1911 proved to be a different story: he rose to the occasion and achieved the greatest result of his chess career.

Teichmann won the 26-player round-robin by a full point over a string of current and future top players — Akiba Rubinstein, Carl Schlechter, Frank Marshall, Aron Nimzowitsch, Savielly Tartakower, Alexander Alekhine, and Rudolf Spielmann among them.

 

 

Here is a brevity against Theodor von Scheve, played at the Berlin Jubilee Tournament of 1907.

Black to play. How did Teichmann conclude the game in short order?

12…?

Don’t abandon your castled king

Chess Tactics: Gusev — Auerbach, 1946

This has to rank as one of the greatest queen sacrifices ever, and it is of the rare positional variety! The move is stunning, but once you see the idea everything becomes crystal clear.

Enjoy!

White to play. How did Gusev earn a slice of immortality?

24.?

Cornered!

Chess Tactics: Chiburdanidze — Dvoirys, 1980

Maia Chiburdanidze wearing the World Champion wreath

Maia Chiburdanidze wearing the World Champion’s laurel wreath, apparently from her 1984 title defense. Photo: Georgia Today

Maia Chiburdanidze (born 1961) became Women’s World Champion in 1978 on her first attempt at just 17 years old. Only Hou Yifan has since bested this record, winning the title at 16 in 2010.

Maia defeated Nona Gaprindashvili, the Champion since 1962. The young Georgian title-holder defended her title on four occasions in the 1980s before losing to Xie Jun in 1991.

Here is a game I first remember seeing in Attack with Mikhail Tal from the Tbilisi semi-final of the 1980 USSR Championship. It is spectacular!

White to play. Can you spot Chiburdanidze’s concept?

12.?

Connected vs. Unconnected Rooks

Chess Tactics: Hermann — Charousek, 1896

Rudolf Charousek. Photo: ChessBase

Rudolf Charousek. Photo: ChessBase

Hungarian master Rudolf Charousek (1873-1900) was an immensely talented player who competed successfully in several of the world’s elite tournaments in the late 1890s.

Like Pillsbury, Charousek was struck down very young, dying of tuberculosis at 26 years old.

 

 

Test yourself in the following position after white’s 17th move.

Black to play. 17…?

My pieces have a failure to communicate!

Chess Tactics: Khalifman — Bareev, 2002

Alexander Khalifman. Photo: Russian Chess Federation

Alexander Khalifman. Source: Russian Chess Federation

Alexander Khalifman (born 1966) won the 1990 New York Open and was ranked equal 10th in the world in 1991. He was a fixture in the Top 20 for much of the next decade.

The St. Petersburg grandmaster is most famous for winning the 1999 FIDE World Championship. That earned him invites to elite events, where he generally held his own.

 

At the 2002 edition of the hallowed Wijk aan Zee tournament, Khalifman was near his career-high rating of 2702 and took down tournament winner Evgeny Bareev‘s Rubinstein French in just 20 moves.

White to play. How did Khalifman end the game suddenly?

20.?

A Bolt from the Blue

Chess Tactics: Pillsbury — Gunsberg, 1895

Harry Nelson Pillsbury: A Top Player Gone Too Soon

Harry Nelson Pillsbury (1872-1906). Photo: World Chess Hall of Fame

Harry Nelson Pillsbury. Photo: World Chess Hall of Fame

Harry Nelson Pillsbury (1872-1906) was one of the world’s best players, but died at only 33 years old. U.S. Champion from 1897 until his death, he was the top American player between Paul Morphy and Frank Marshall.

Pillsbury won the celebrated Hastings 1895 tournament ahead of World Champion Emanuel Lasker and former Champion Wilhelm Steinitz. He also left behind several past and future Challengers: Mikhail Chigorin, Siegbert Tarrasch, Carl Schlechter, David Janowsky, and Isidor Gunsberg.

The Crowning Moment of his Crowning Moment

Pillsbury won the month-long round-robin at Hastings by defeating Gunsberg in the 21st and final round with an endgame breakthrough that will live forever in chess history.

White to play.

27.?

 

Passed Pawns: Hard to Contain in the Endgame!

Harry Nelson Pillsbury gave us a powerful display of protected passed pawns and connected passed pawns being a huge help in winning games! Besides purely “chess” factors, decision making becomes a lot easier for the side that possesses them, while the opponent needs to be very careful.

Chess Tactics: Shirov — Polgar, 1994

Polgar turns the tables on Shirov’s aggression

It was the perfect setting for a showdown between two of the most combative players of the 1990s and 2000s: a thematic tournament stipulating every game begin with an Open Sicilian (1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 and, after 2…Nc6, 2…d6, or 2…e6, 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4).

Polgar chose a Paulsen Sicilian, where black places pawns on a6, d6, and e6, and develops the queen knight to c6. Shirov, not surprisingly, decided to tackle it with an early g4 and f4.

This was risky, because it exposed the white king, who had not castled to safety. Decisions like these can create brilliancies — for the player or their opponent!

The Hungarian prodigy was up to the task. One of the first females to earn the Grandmaster title (1991), Judit Polgar broke Bobby Fischer’s record (from 1958!) as youngest GM ever. She is universally recognized as the greatest female player in chess history.

Black’s 10th move sets the stage for everything to follow, How would you deal with white’s coming pawn storm while gaining activity for your pieces?

10…?

Fight for key squares with all your might!

Judit Polgar retired from professional chess after the 2014 Tromso Olympiad, but this will not be the last time we see one of her games on chess-essentials.com!

Chess Tactics: Velimirovic — Rajkovic, 1971

The Pirc Defense is dangerous for both players!

When black answers 1.e4 with the Pirc (1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 g6), things can get weird in a hurry. Defenses like the French can become complex and tactical, but in a “standard” way.

Pirc Defense players fight for more wins, and are willing to risk more losses in the process. Don’t expect a lot of draws! Garry Kasparov’s immortal victory against Veselin Topalov in Wijk aan Zee 1999 also occurred in the Pirc.

The Pirc is somewhat reminiscent of the Sicilian Dragon or Alekhine’s Defense in the e4-universe, and the Modern Benoni in the d4-universe.

I would not have chosen such a risky line against Dragoljub Velimirovic, one of the most imaginative attackers in history! The uncompromising Velimirovic Attack in the Classical Sicilian is named after him.

Dragoljub Velimirovic (1942-2014). Photo: Eric Koch/ANeFo

Dragoljub Velimirovic (1942-2014) in 1966. Photo: Eric Koch/ANeFo

Velimirovic chose the space-gaining Austrian Attack (4.f4), and followed up with the dynamic 6.e5.

Rajkovic initially met this aggression in kind, setting up counterplay in the center. His 8th move was questionable, but probably ok.

He was undone by hesitating after white’s stunning 10th move and struggled for the remainder of the game. A great example of winning by creating more powerful threats than your opponent can muster!

There are some lovely variations in the comments. Please click through them and enjoy!

The value of each move is very high!

Chess Tactics: Svidler — Vallejo-Pons, 2004

Svidler and Vallejo’s Rapid Race in the English Attack

We pick up the action after white’s 25th move. White has just moved his king out of check.

Francisco Vallejo-Pons in 2013. Photo: Przemyslaw Jahr/Wikimedia Commons

Peter Svidler has been one of the world’s best players since the 1990s. The 8-time(!) Russian Champion has played many outstanding games and has become one of the most popular chess commentators.

In contrast, this was the only game the young Francisco Vallejo-Pons won in the 2004 Melody Amber rapid, but what a victory it was! White’s king gets caught in a hurricane in a theoretical mainline of the Najdorf English Attack (1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3).

With competing opposite-side castling attacks, Svidler decides to fight off black’s attack before launching an offensive of his own.

He never got the chance. How did Vallejo-Pons respond to 25.Ka1?

Pawns are line-opening tools in opposite-side castling attacks